DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/sgem2017/61/S24.007

CHEMICAL CO-PRECIPITATION SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL COATED IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

J. Markhulia, S. Kekutia, Z. Jabua, V. Mikhelashvili, L. Saneblidze
Tuesday 12 September 2017 by Libadmin2017

References: 17th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2017, www.sgem.org, SGEM2017 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7408-12-6 / ISSN 1314-2704, 29 June - 5 July, 2017, Vol. 17, Issue 61, 51-58 pp, DOI: 10.5593/sgem2017/61/S24.007

ABSTRACT

Surface modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the various areas. The main requirements to magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications are the nontoxicity, biocompatibility and high-level accumulation in the target tissue or organ, chemical stability, simplicity and reproducibility of synthesis. The composition and characteristics of the SPION surface have a strong influence on their stability, distribution, and biocompatibility, with regard to cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. This study is focused on the development of the synthesis of aqueous suspensions of SPIONs stabilized with hydrophilic polymer - polyethylene glycol (PEG).

Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized via a controlled co-precipitation technique in the vacuum environment. Crystalline structures and particle sizes obtained iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Magnetic properties were studied using the Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Also, investigated the influence of PEG-coated SPIONs on the viability of the bacterial colonies of the Staphylococcus epidermidis. The detected bactericidal effect was time and growth phase-dependent. The outcomes of this study will further lead to the possible application of SPIONs for human chronic wound healing.

Keywords: Magnetic nanofluids, PEG, Magnetic nanoparticles, bactericide, Staphylococcus epidermidis