DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2016/B61/S25.093

RED MARC - PHENOLIC PROFILE AND ITS HEALTH BENEFITS

D.Stegarus, M.Baltes, E.Lengyel, O.Tita
Wednesday 7 September 2016 by Libadmin2016

References: 16th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2016, www.sgem.org, SGEM2016 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-68-1 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 28 - July 6, 2016, Book6 Vol. 1, 707-714 pp

ABSTRACT

This paper aims to identify and quantify compounds, such as tannins and anthocyanins from valuable herb known as potentially bioactive plants used in traditional medicine, beverage production and special food. Thus, they were monitored 26 species of plants (leaves, fruit) chicory (Cichorium intybus), yarrow (Achillea millefolium), bilberry (leaves and fruits) (Vaccinium myrtillus), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), juniper (Juniperus communis), cranberry (branches and fruits) (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), dill (Anethum graveolens), thorn (Xanthium spinosum), mint (Mentha), raspberry (leaves and fruits) (Rubus idaeus), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), celandine ( Chelidonium majus), wild rose (Rosa canina), Lady’s bedstraw (Galium mullugo), dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), willow herb (Epilobium), centaury (Centaurium erythraea), oregano (Origanum vulgare) St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum), dumb (Teucrium chamaedrys), strawberries (Fragaria), raspberry (Rubus idaeus) blackberry (Rubus fruticosus), cherry (Prunus cerasus). The study led to the amounts which ranged from 4.4549 g / 100 g to 89.5833 g / 100g tannin, and 1.2 mg / 100 g to 109,7mg / 100g anthocyanin. The obtained results lead to the conclusion that these plants can be used in medicine and food.

Keywords: plants, bioactive potential, tannin, anthocyanins