DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2014/B52/S20.055

LOST MINING LANDSCAPES AND THEIR USE IN GEOTOURISM. A CASE STUDY FROM THE DOLINA PEKLO - HELL VALLEY IN THE CENTRAL SLOVAKIA

P. Hroncek, J. Liga
Wednesday 1 October 2014 by Libadmin2014

References: 14th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2014, www.sgem.org, SGEM2014 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-18-6 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 19-25, 2014, Book 5, Vol. 2, 415-422 pp

ABSTRACT
The mining tourism of today focuses mainly on the preserved relics of mining
landscapes, whether they are represented by the terrain shapes on the surface or
underground, the existing buildings and technical equipments and their relics, or
residential buildings and various mining points of interest in the landscape. These
historical mining landscape are accessed by visitors via various sightseeing tours,
educational trails, bicycle trails etc., whose common feature is the necessity of the in situ presence of stationary posters and information panels. Slovakia has many medieval and early Modern Age mining sites, which rank among the most important in their period, but many of them lack any preserved and visible mining
relics in the present landscape. A similar situation is also in the Peklo Valley situated in the hinterland of the former free royal town Ľubietová (Central Slovakia), which belonged to the most important mining sites in Hungary in the 19th century.
The mining and metallurgical site Peklo (Hell) was reconstructed upon the research of archival documents and historical maps. We have reconstructed the possible landscape appearance in the 17th – 18th century. A smelter (the Slovak blast furnace) for the smelting of iron ore mined in the local mines was situated here. The waterwheel was used to blow air into the blast furnace. The second waterwheel in this site was used to propel the watermill. A network of waterways and pipes was present, together with the place for charcoal burning, as well as a warehouse for charcoal and tools storage. The site contained three wooden cottages built for miners, metallurgists, woodcutters and charcoal burners. A hereditary mining gallery was a part of the complex apart from galleries for iron ore mining. We have created a 3-dimensional landscape model of the site in the given historical period, based on archival and field research. The site visualization could be freely available on the Internet in the future and tourists would be able to download it to their portable computers or mobile devices. Historical mining sites presented in this form and freely available directly from the field, will represent an important part of the mining tourism in the coming years.

Keywords: lost mining landscapes, mining tourism, Peklo Valley, 3-D landscape
model, geotourism