DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2014/B52/S20.046

IMPLICATIONS OF VECTORS AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE WEST NILE VIRUS MORBIDITY

M. Debita, C. L. Musat, D. L. Buruiana
Wednesday 1 October 2014 by Libadmin2014

References: 14th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2014, www.sgem.org, SGEM2014 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-18-6 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 19-25, 2014, Book 5, Vol. 2, 343-350 pp

ABSTRACT
The present-day world policies have been focusing on improving the programs of
epidemiological and epizootological supervision in order to socially and economically protect the human population in the humid and lush vegetation areas specific to deltas and rural regions, susceptible to contamination by arboviruses. The illnesses caused by viruses transmitted by vectors (blood-sucking insects, like mosquitoes) display natural focality, impacting the exposed populations, and thus causing 10-15% of the serious forms of encephalitis and meningoencephalitis. The West Nile virus is one of the most common arboviruses, determining endemic and epidemic symptoms. As people, animal and bird circulation is on constant increase, besides natural migrations, additional measures of epidemiological, epizootological and environmental supervision are necessary. The new supervision policies focus on a better genuine detection of illnesses in the exposed population by means of the unique case definition, and standardised statistical interpretations, together with measures of environmental protection and combating the circulating vectors.

Keywords: ecology, vectors, risk, West Nile virus