DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2014/B32/S13.032

RESEARCH ON EFFECT OF VEGETATION USE ON SOIL EROSION AND CONSERVATION IN THE HILLY AGROECOSYSTEMS IN ROMANIA

S.Mircea, N. Petrescu, A. Tronac, R.Teodorescu, Petre Voicu
Wednesday 1 October 2014 by Libadmin2014

References: 14th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2014, www.sgem.org, SGEM2014 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-14-8 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 19-25, 2014, Book 3, Vol. 2, 239-244 pp

ABSTRACT
As it is known, a good status of land cover has an important role in reducing of runoffs and soil losses in the torrential agricultural watersheds. A good vegetation cover reduces the erosive power of impacting raindrops and thus splash erosion, furthermore it reduces the volume of water reaching the soil surface. The effectiveness of land cover in reducing soil erosion depends upon the plants’ density, height and continuity of the canopy. In Romania, soil erosion represents a big problem for the hilly agricultural lands, especially in the last period of time and mainly after the finalization of land restitution process. The paper presents some of the results of a study carried out at the Agronomic University’s Aldeni/Buzau Research Station on Soil Erosion, concerning soil losses under different crops and pedo-climate conditions. Based on the longtime field measurements conducted on the runoff plots, in the period 1992-2012, the role of the vegetation and crop factor were checked and some strong correlations were established between the soil loss on different slope steepness and the erosive factor.

Keywords: soil erosion, soil loss, runoff plots, vegetation, erosive factor

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