DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2014/B22/S9.068

THE NETWORK THEORY IN THE PROCESS OF CREATING AND ANALYZING FROM VERTICAL CRUSTAL MOVEMENTS

A. Kowalczyk, K. Kowalczyk
Wednesday 1 October 2014 by Libadmin2014

References: 14th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2014, www.sgem.org, SGEM2014 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-11-7 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 19-25, 2014, Book 2, Vol. 2, 545-552 pp

ABSTRACT
A wide range of interpolation methods are used to build spatial models connected with physical phenomena. Usually, primary data is not placed regularly and the choice of joint is related to the interpolation method used. Through the choice of the interpolation method, we can limit for example the influence of phenomena taking place within greater distances, as well as through the choice of the most advantageous adjoining points. With that choice, TIN -a network of triangles is built. If we assume a linear character of a change in a certain phenomenon, it is then indispensable to delineate the joints between which interpolation will be conducted. Not knowing the dependencies between the values obtained in adjoining measure points, we use assumption and mathematical solutions which define these joints. The most widespread method is Delaney’s triangulation. There are, however, methods which do not base on triangulation. In these methods, joining is done via determining mutual relations between adjoining values and seeking a course of similar characteristics. It can be said that they form specific skeletal lines in surface models of physical phenomena. The following article describes an attempt to use network analyses for orgnising a geographical space with relation to physical phenomena (vertical crustal movements). As data, we can find unlevelled linear trends on delineated on vectors between the GNSS stations.

Keywords: model, network, nodes, vertical movements