DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/sgem2012/s16.v4013

NITRATE PRODUCTION IN A SILTY CLAY SOIL AMENDED WITH CATTLE MANURE COMPOSTS TREATED WITH CHLORTETRACYCLINE

S. KENDE, A. KARAM, E. PARENT LEON
Wednesday 1 August 2012 by Libadmin2012

References: 12th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference, www.sgem.org, SGEM2012 Conference Proceedings/ ISSN 1314-2704, June 17-23, 2012, Vol. 4, 141 - 148 pp

ABSTRACT

Composted manures are widely used as soil amendments to improve the fertility of soils
by adding humified organic matter and plant nutrients such as nitrogen (N). In order for
crop plants to be able to use N, added organic N must be converted to available forms
such as ammonium and nitrate (NO3) through microbial activity. However, some
compost made of animal manures may contain antibiotics as growth promoters. There is
little information on the production of NO3 in fine-textured soils amended with manure
composts containing veterinary antibiotics. An incubation experiment was conducted to
monitor NO3-N evolution in an agricultural silty clay soil amended with two composts
receiving chlortetracycline (CTC) and sampled at seven occasions (0, 10, 20, 40, 80,
120, and 160 days) under controlled laboratory conditions. The soil had 32.0 g C/kg, 1.8
g N/kg, and a pH (H2O) of 6.9. The two composts were made of cattle manures and
wood chips (CW) or straw (CS). The soil, composts and compost-amended soil received
three rates of CTC (0, 450 and 2250 μg CTC/kg). The compost treatments were
prepared by adding 0, 15.45 and 30.9 g CS/kg soil or 0, 12.5 and 25.0 g CW/kg soil in
order to provide 0, 2.75 and 5.50 g total N/ kg soil. Results indicated that the percentage
of NO3-N produced during the incubation period ranged from 1.8 to 12.4 % and 0.8% to
10.9% of added N in the soil amended with the highest rate of CS and CW without
CTC, respectively. In general, soil amended with CTC-treated CW produced slightly
larger amounts of NO3-N compared to soil amended with CTC-treated CS. The amount
of NO3-N produced in soil amended with CTC-treated composts was less than that in
soil amended with composts without CTC (control). Overall, it can be concluded that
applying 2250 μg CTC/kg wet compost did not affect markedly nitrification process in
silty clay soil amended with cattle manure compost.

Keywords: organic materials, mineralization, nitrification, veterinary antibiotic.

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